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Orthopedics Through a Keyhole

Executive Summary

Across a wide range of specialties, the unique features of minimally invasive surgery provides a consistent array of beneifts to patients, and orthopedic surgeons have worked hard over the past several years to reduce the size of incisions in hip and knee replacement. Skeptics argue that, given the extremely high success rates of conventional hip and knee replacement surgery, any movement toward MIS should be slow and should look beyond patient appeal to focus on long-term results. For MIS leader Zimmer, the bet on the new technique is a big one. The widespread adoption of MIS in orthopedics is less about the transformation of a procedure than about the transformation of a company and an industry.

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