In Vivo is part of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC’s registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use. For high-quality copies or electronic reprints for distribution to colleagues or customers, please call +44 (0) 20 3377 3183

Printed By

UsernamePublicRestriction
UsernamePublicRestriction

Healthy Convergence

Executive Summary

Some health care firms have managed to work around the industry's well-documented growth constraints by pursuing a strategy of convergence--finding new combinations of formerly distinct market segments for pharmaceuticals, devices, and diagnostics. The authors, at Bain & Company, outline the considerations that drive the evaluation of and set the stage for convergence opportunities. Companies can use them to capitalize on an array of opportunities throughout the commercialization continuum and develop a response to potential threats from the outside.

You may also be interested in...



The Buzz at JP Morgan--Devices: No Longer the Conference Stepchild

Over the past five years, big cap device companies have been some of the strongest performers among all life science stocks, and this year's conference represented something of a renaissance of device companies. However, most interesting wasn't so much the revival of interest in device stocks itself, but the message that device companies sent and that investors are embracing: "Forget about the hype; slow and steady wins the race."

Imaging in its Heyday: Clinical Applications (Part II)

As scientific innovation in molecular imaging explodes, experts believe the big payoff will be in clinical, rather than research, applications. But absent validating clinical data, businesses remain hesitant to jump into the field.

When the Body Alone Can't Build Bone

Orthobiologics are now on the horizon, driving suppliers to increase R&D spending. The goal is to develop high-margin products that will actively promote bone formation. Has the slow progress to commercialization of the first two products--bone morphogenic proteins developed by the collaborations of Stryker Corp/Creative Biomolecules and Genetics Institute/Sofamor Danek--helped prime the market to accept a new technology? Or has the perception of delay dampened enthusiasm and scared off some of the big orthopedics players?

Topics

Related Companies

Related Deals

UsernamePublicRestriction

Register

ID1132115

Ask The Analyst

Ask the Analyst is free for subscribers.  Submit your question and one of our analysts will be in touch.

Your question has been successfully sent to the email address below and we will get back as soon as possible. my@email.address.

All fields are required.

Please make sure all fields are completed.

Please make sure you have filled out all fields

Please make sure you have filled out all fields

Please enter a valid e-mail address

Please enter a valid Phone Number

Ask your question to our analysts

Cancel