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Inhaled Insulin is Dead. Long Live Inhaled Insulin

Executive Summary

In early March, Eli Lilly became the third major pharmaceutical company to scupper its inhaled insulin program. Almost immediately the blogosphere began nailing inhaled insulin's coffin shut. IN VIVO thinks it's still too soon to deliver a eulogy. One company, MannKind, continues undaunted, despite the setbacks for it's competitors, hoping to bring its inhaled insulin to market by 2010. Meantime, specialty pharmaceutical companies or glucose monitoring testing outfits might be interested in the inhaled programs spurned by Big Pharma, but only for the right price.

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