In Vivo is part of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC’s registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use. For high-quality copies or electronic reprints for distribution to colleagues or customers, please call +44 (0) 20 3377 3183

Printed By

UsernamePublicRestriction
UsernamePublicRestriction

Negative Innovation: Helping Reduce Health Care Technology Costs

Executive Summary

At the recent Stanford Center for Cardiovascular Technology Annual Symposium 2010, hosted by Stanford University's Peter Fitzgerald, MD, PhD, and Alan C. Yeung, MD, one of the newest buzzwords in medical device development was "negative innovation". Increasingly, executives, particularly at big companies, are coming around to the notion that in the future, a product development model that posits that incremental device innovation will continue to be rewarded with premium pricing and wide adoption won't hold anymore. Instead, they argue, in a world in which health care costs are scrutinized ever more closely and initiatives like comparative effectiveness bring cost and quality into the same discussion, the US health care system will begin to favor a new kind of value proposition: devices that reduce costs, while delivering equivalent, and perhaps in some cases even slightly worse, outcomes.

You may also be interested in...



iRhythm: Reinventing Arrhythmia Monitoring

There has been a tendency in the health care products industries to design products that serve the maximum number of patients, in order to create the biggest markets. In pursuit of that all inclusive goal, medical device companies have often overengineered products, adding features - and costs - not necessary for the majority of patients. This has been the case in the field of arrhythmia monitoring. By challenging previous assumptions about arrhythmia monitoring, iRhythm believes it's developed a device that improves the diagnostic efficiency and ultimately the economics of arrhythmia care.

Top Device Stories Of 2010: Waiting For The Other Shoes To Fall

For much of the device industry, 2010 felt like a transition year, breeding uncertainty in a number of important areas, including the economy, health care reform, and impending changes to the 510(k) process. A review of the year just ended turns up these stories: Device M&A on the Rebound; Is A First-Mover Advantage Emerging In Medtech? Boston Scientific Is Back In The Game; Early-Stage Deals In Decline; The Future Of Medtech: Where Private Investment Dollars Are Flowing; Transcatheter Valves Take Center Stage; Spine's Downturn; Diabetes Assumptions Begin To Shift; A Landmark Year In Ophthalmology; Health Reform In 2010: A Beginning, Not An End; Changes At FDA: 510(k) Reform Takes Shape, and finally, Is Physician Choice In Product Selection In Danger?

Top Device Stories Of 2010: Waiting For The Other Shoes To Fall

For much of the device industry, 2010 felt like a transition year, breeding uncertainty in a number of important areas, including the economy, health care reform, and impending changes to the 510(k) process. A review of the year just ended turns up these stories: Device M&A on the Rebound; Is A First-Mover Advantage Emerging In Medtech? Boston Scientific Is Back In The Game; Early-Stage Deals In Decline; The Future Of Medtech: Where Private Investment Dollars Are Flowing; Transcatheter Valves Take Center Stage; Spine's Downturn; Diabetes Assumptions Begin To Shift; A Landmark Year In Ophthalmology; Health Reform In 2010: A Beginning, Not An End; Changes At FDA: 510(k) Reform Takes Shape, and finally, Is Physician Choice In Product Selection In Danger?

Related Content

Topics

Related Companies

UsernamePublicRestriction

Register

OM006665

Ask The Analyst

Ask the Analyst is free for subscribers.  Submit your question and one of our analysts will be in touch.

Your question has been successfully sent to the email address below and we will get back as soon as possible. my@email.address.

All fields are required.

Please make sure all fields are completed.

Please make sure you have filled out all fields

Please make sure you have filled out all fields

Please enter a valid e-mail address

Please enter a valid Phone Number

Ask your question to our analysts

Cancel