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Medtech Investing In Europe: Nowhere To Go But Up

Executive Summary

Even as the rest of the global economy seems somewhat on a path to recovery, medtech-focused VCs, in the US at least, are experiencing a time of significant uncertainty and attrition: fewer dollars available for new investments, a trend away from early-stage deals, and fewer and smaller venture firms overseeing smaller new funds. For European medtech investors, there has been little of the gloom and uncertainty that the US venture capital community has experienced over the past several years, if only because there was no pre-bust bubble from which to fall.

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In Europe, Contrarian VC Wellington Partners Favors Medical Devices

In September, Wellington Partners announced that it closed on €70 million ($91 million) in new venture capital, the first commitment for a fund devoted to life science investing. The target size of Wellington Partners IV Life Science Fund is €120 million, a significant increase over its previous fund devoted to the life sciences, which raised €78 million. Five years ago, this event wouldn’t even have been news, but in a world where venture capital funds are generally contracting, and specifically with regard to life sciences, Wellington offers medical device start-ups a bright spot of hope.

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