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Packard BioScience Co.

Division of PerkinElmer Inc.
www.packardbioscience.com

Latest From Packard BioScience Co.

Deal Statistics Quarterly, Q3 2001

In Vivo presents another installment of our quarterly review of dealmaking--in this case July 2001-September 2001. Our data come from Windhover's Strategic Transactions Database. We include medical device financings by deal type; diagnostic financings by industry segment; pharma and biotech alliances by therapeutic category and industry segment; pharma and biotech financings by market segment, and pharma and biotech M&A.
BioPharmaceutical Medical Device

Protein Arrays: When Genes Are Not Enough

There's growing conviction that gene arrays are less useful than first imagined for expression studies and diagnostics--and that directly reading protein expression will more likely provide an accurate picture of biological status-health, disease, and pharmaceutical response. Thus, a number of companies have started up to create, on the analogy of gene arrays, protein arrays, to allow the simultaneous and quantitative testing of large numbers of proteins-potentially thousands.But the task is easier said than done. First, there are too few proteins known to allow testing for worthwhile expression patterns; and, second, because of the delicacy and variety of proteins, surface chemistry and other problems have historically made arrays impractical. None of this daunts the start-ups who, opportunistic, are looking to exploit the markets they think they can get to first: clinical diagnostics and pharmaceutical clinical development programs.
BioPharmaceutical Medical Device

Motorola: Paging Diagnostics

Motorola is developing an expertise in microarray manufacturing to use as the jump-off point for a new life sciences initiative it hopes will turn into a high-margin, high-growth diagnostics business. It has spent $500 million in external investments to support the venture, including the $280 million acquisition of a clinical diagnostics start-up. But with its investors concerned with the recent downturn in demand in its core high-tech manufacturing businesses, the company is understandably reticent about touting the possibility of life sciences being its next big thing. On the other hand, should Motorola gain momentum and demonstrate an ability to tap the clinical diagnostics markets, the biochip initiative could ultimately become a broad-based point-of-care play, with the company drawing on its expertise in wireless communications to produce interactive handheld devices that would capture and transmit data to a remote site for analysis.
Medical Device Strategy
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Company Information

  • Industry
  • In Vitro Diagnostics
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Research, Analytical Equipment & Supplies
  • Therapeutic Areas
  • Non-Specific
  • Alias(es)
  • Ownership
  • Private
  • Headquarters
  • Worldwide
    • North America
      • USA
  • Parent & Subsidiaries
  • PerkinElmer Inc.
  • Senior Management
  • Emery G Olcott, Chmn. & CEO
    Frank Witney, PhD, Pres. & COO
  • Contact Info
  • Packard BioScience Co.
    Phone: (203) 238-2351
    800 Research Pkwy.
    Meriden, CT 06450
    USA
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