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Imatron Inc.

Division of General Electric Co.
www.geimatron.com

Latest From Imatron Inc.

Vulnerable Plaque Heats Up

Vulnerable plaque is the hottest cardiovascular device opportunity in years. But in shifting thinking about coronary disease from structural to biological processes, it challenges what it means to be a device company. As more evidence suggests vulnerable plaque is a systemic rather than local problem and as the underlying assumptions about coronary disease shift from a structural view to a biological one, conventional device approaches are challenged.
Medical Device Platform Technologies

Deal Statistics Quarterly, Q3 2001

In Vivo presents another installment of our quarterly review of dealmaking--in this case July 2001-September 2001. Our data come from Windhover's Strategic Transactions Database. We include medical device financings by deal type; diagnostic financings by industry segment; pharma and biotech alliances by therapeutic category and industry segment; pharma and biotech financings by market segment, and pharma and biotech M&A.
BioPharmaceutical Medical Device

The Unstable State of Plaque Detection

Recent research points to unstable, rather than stenotic plaque, as a major cause of heart attacks. Cardiologists, as much as entrepreneurs and large companies, are therefore driving the creation of new cardiac detection platforms based on characterizing arterial plaque in order to identify patients that are unaware that they are at risk of suffering a myocardial infarction. First-generation detection tools are well along in development, but the scientific understanding about plaque is evolving so rapidly, technologies may be obsolete by the time they are ready for commercialization. Finally, looking for heart attack risk in symptomless patients means screening apparently healthy patients based on risk factors. Clinicians aren't yet prepared for the treatment implications and payers aren't ready for the economic burden of widespread screening, and this presents one of the greatest challenges for companies introducing new plaque detection technologies.
Medical Device Strategy

Imatron: Speed Saves

Imatron's electron beam tomography, or EBT, offers clinicians a valuable tool to detect the early presence of heart disease, by looking for calcium deposits that are a surrogate for plaque build-up, and to help them begin treatment or lifestyle changes before heart attacks occur. But adoption or acceptance of EBT has been slow in coming, the result of physician skepticism, consumer ignorance, and most importantly, insurer resistance. Some physicians are skeptical because EBT measures neither restenosis no so-called vulnerable plaque. Things are looking up for Imatron, however. Sales of EBT systems are increasing rapidly due to greater acceptance in the medical community and the launch of the company's own sales force.
Medical Device Innovation
See All

Company Information

  • Industry
  • Medical Devices
    • Diagnostic Imaging Equipment & Supplies
  • Therapeutic Areas
  • Alias(es)
  • Ownership
  • Private
  • Headquarters
  • Worldwide
    • North America
      • USA
  • Parent & Subsidiaries
  • General Electric Co.
  • Senior Management
  • S. L Meyer, Pres. & CEO
    Gary H Brooks, VP, CFO
    Al Raszkowski, VP, Int'l. Sales & Mktg.
    John Couch, VP, R&D
  • Contact Info
  • Imatron Inc.
    Phone: (650) 583-9964
    389 Oyster Point Blvd.
    S. San Francisco, CA 94080
    USA
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