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Advancing Comparative Effectiveness Research: An Interview with Sean Tunis

Executive Summary

Sean Tunis is director of the Center for Medical Technology Policy and a leading advocate for comparative effectiveness research and evidence-based medicine. Formerly Director of the Office of Clinical Standards and Quality and CMO of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, he discusses the state of comparative effectiveness advocacy and his current work developing medical device protocols aimed at providing actionable information to physicians, patients, and payors.

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