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ImClone and Bristol: The Acquisition Fight Focuses on the Erbitux Successor

Executive Summary

ImClone chairman Carl Icahn wants Bristol-Myers Squibb to pay a lot more in order to acquire the developer of blockbuster cancer drug Erbitux. His argument: there's a lot more to ImClone than Erbitux, namely, a competitive follow-on. Bristol thinks it's already got the rights to that compound; Icahn apparently disagrees (and indeed Amgen wriggled out of a similar dispute over a follow-on with J&J). But a close reading of the Bristol/ImClone contract tends to agree with Bristol.

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