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Pharmaceutical/Biotechnology Deal Statistics Quarterly, Q3 2010

Executive Summary

Biopharma financings slumped in the third quarter of 2010 - the $1.69 billion raised in Q3 was about half of Q2's $3.37 billion. Most of the third quarter money came from VC rounds. Two-thirds of the M&A total came from J&J's $2.2 billion purchase of the 82.1% of Crucell that it didn't already own. And following a long stretch in which earlier-stage assets were grabbing the largest deal values, Q3's biopharma alliances proved the contrary - the majority of the biggest moneymakers were for Phase II and higher therapeutics.

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